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Research Profile

Prof Trevor Jones 


Career Profile

I started my research career at the independent Policy Studies Institute (PSI) in London, where I undertook research in two main areas – policing and labour market studies. The former included studies of police accountability, international comparisons of police governance, private security and policing, and youth crime prevention; the latter included studies of youth unemployment, and the labour market positions of ethnic minority groups. I was a lecturer in criminology for a year in the Centre for Law and Society, Edinburgh University for the academic year 1997/8, before joining the Cardiff School of Social Sciences in 1998.

Teaching Profile

Undergraduate

  • Year One: Theories of Crime and Punishment (module convenor)
  • Year Two: Responses to Crime (module convenor)
  • Year Three: Crime Control, Regulation and Policing (module convenor); Diversity, Crime and  Criminal Justice; Criminological Practice;  Dissertation supervision.

Taught Masters

  • Police and Policing
  • Penal Theory and Practice
  • Dissertation supervision

PhD Supervision

I am interested in PhD supervision in a range of areas related to policing and the governance of security - especially police accountability and commercial security. Also, in studies relating to criminal justice and penal policy-making, policy transfer and crime control, crime and tourism.

Current PhD supervisions include: Relationships between the police and Chinese communities in the UK (Chris Pac-Soo); Crime, security and regeneration in Cardiff Bay (Oliver Cowan); The local politics of 'anti-social behaviour' (Victoria Chessell-Edgar); Policing, securitization and police counter-terrorism policy (Jasmin Tregidga); Risk Assessment and Mentally Disordered Offenders (Jeremy Dixon); Violence and its regulation in professional ice hockey (Victoria Silverwood);  Piracy, fear of crime and sea-farers’ welfare (Sarah Symons); Policing, Regulation and Cannabis (David Brewster); criminal defence reforms and the commercialization of the criminal process (Jodi Morgan)